Paul Blacker Acupuncture Tennis Elbow

Tennis Elbow

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Learn more about Tennis Elbow here

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is characterised by pain and tenderness over the lateral epicondyle of the humerus. In the UK, the annual incidence of lateral elbow pain in general practice is around 4/1000 to 7/1000 people.(Hamilton 1986) It is most common in people aged between 40 and 50 years (Allander 1974); for example, the incidence is as much as 10% in women aged 42 to 46 years.(Chard 1989; Verhaar 1994)

Tennis elbow is considered an overload injury, and it typically occurs after minor trauma of the extensor muscles of the forearm; tennis is a direct cause in only 5% of people with the condition.(Murtagh 1988). It is primarily a type of tendonitis though the muscles and bones of the epicondyle joint may also be involved. Pain can also occur on the inner side of the elbow, which is known as golfer’s elbow. Although generally self-limiting, symptoms of tennis elbow can persist for 1.5 to 2 years or even longer in a minority of people.(Hudak 1996)

The aims of conventional medical interventions are to relieve pain, control inflammation and accelerate repair in order to improve function. Treatments include corticosteroid injections, topical and oral NSAIDs, other analgesics, exercises, ultrasound, orthoses and surgery.